Wild Morning Glory

“The marvels of daily life are exciting; no movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street.”

~Robert Doisneau (1912-1994), French photographer

(Quote Source: brainyquote.com)

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While some may debate the “excitement” of this photo, I encourage viewers to consider the way the vine has wound its way around the dead branches of an old tree.  It was the lovely pink blossom of this wild morning glory that caught my eye as I walked. Note the blossoms yet to open during these lovely fall days of September – an unexpected find that brought a smile to my face.

Garden Visitor

“The kiss of the sun for pardon,

The songs of the birds for mirth,

One is nearer God’s heart in a garden

Than anywhere else on earth.”

~ Dorothy Frances Gurney (1858-1932), “God’s Garden” lines 13–16, Poems, by Dorothy Frances Gurney
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A freshly emerged monarch butterfly flits about a garden in Duluth, Minnesota.

Patience

“Everything that slows us down and forces patience, everything that sets us back into the slow circles of nature, is a help. Gardening is an instrument of grace.”

~May Sarton (1912-1995), Poet

(Read more at: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/m/maysarton133734.html)

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Sunflowers reaching for the sky on a small Minnesota farm.

Learning

“Face it. We’re all ignorant. But there’s a big difference between not knowing anything about, say, astrophysics, and not knowing anything about the natural world we inhabit. The sad fact is, when it comes to nature, the average American is clueless about some very basic stuff.

For example, a recent poll taken at the National Zoo in Washington, DC, revealed that over 75% of their visitors did not know the purpose of pollination.”

~ Andy Wasowski, Native Gardens for Dry Climates

(Quote Source: October 24, 1997 interview as posted on loe.org.  See link at:  http://loe.org/shows/segments.html?programID=97-P13-00043&segmentID=6)

Honey-Bee-Sedum

(Honey bee on sedum plant)

I am grateful to people that blog.  I appreciate their courage and commitment to the sharing of ideas, experiences, creativity, research, and thoughts with the rest of the world.  I have learned so much in the last year.  Thank you!

 

Please Don’t Pick the Trilliums

“God has sown his name on the heavens in glittering stars; but on earth he planteth His name by tender flowers.”

~ Jean Paul Richter, (1763-1825) German Romantic writer

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This lovely white flower with just three petals on a single stem is known as the Large-flowered Trillium (Trillium grandiflorum).  It can be found in the woodlands of Minnesota and I am lucky enough to have quite a few growing on my property.  Because picking even a part of the plant can kill the whole thing, trilliums are considered quite fragile.  In addition, this plant is slow to establish, taking years to flower.

Large-flowered trilliums are also sensitive to changes in their environment, so they can be good indicators of the health of a forest. Trillium populations have been on the decline, primarily because of soil disturbance, the loss of soil organic matter from non-native earthworms, buckthorn invasion, and overgrazing by deer.  Consequently, Minnesota and many other states have laws to restrict the collection of trilliums. In Minnesota it is illegal to remove trilliums from public land or another person’s property without the owner’s consent.

(Source: http://www.bwsr.state.mn.us/news/webnews/may2014/5.pdf)

The White Lilacs

“Gardeners, like everyone else, live second by second and minute by minute.  What we see at one particular moment is then and there before us.  But there is a second way of seeing. Seeing with the eye of memory, not the eye of our anatomy, calls up days and seasons past and years gone by.”

~ Allen Lacy, The Gardener’s Eye, 1992, page 16

(Quotation source: gardendigest.com)IMG_9638-1-3

My mother planted white lilacs in the backyard of my childhood home. I loved them so much that I took a snippet of a bush and planted it in my own backyard some years ago. They are blooming right now and serve as a happy reminder of those carefree days that I enjoyed as a child.

Do any of you have plants that bring back happy memories?

A Rhododendron for Minnesota

“The flower is the poetry of reproduction.  It is an example of the eternal seductiveness of life.”

~Jean Giradoux (1882-1944) French playwright, novelist, and diplomat

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The selection of perennial plants for a Minnesota garden can prove a challenge. Gardeners must always keep in mind that plants will have to survive the cold of our winters. Every spring when my P.J.M. Rhododendron blooms again my heart does a little dance. It is a welcome reminder of the warmer and more colorful days ahead.

Spring

“Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.”

~ Henry David Thoreau, (1817-1862) American essayist, poet, and practical philosopher; author of the book, Walden

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The Hepatica wildflowers have poked their way up through the remains of last fall.  Spring has truly arrived in northern Minnesota.

What’s in a Smell?

“Nothing is more memorable than a smell.  One scent can be unexpected, momentary and fleeting, yet conjure up a childhood summer beside a lake in the mountains; another, a moonlit beach; a third, a family dinner of pot roast and sweet potatoes during a myrtle-mad August in a midwestern town.  Smells detonate softly in our memory like poignant land mines hidden under the weedy mass of years.  Hit a tripwire of smell and memories explode all at once.  A complex vision leaps out of the undergrowth.”

~Diane Ackerman (1948- ), A Natural History of the Senses

(Quote via quoteland.com)

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A lovely cow sniffing the fresh blooms of spring.

Stop and See the Flowers

“There is more to life than increasing its speed.”

~Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) Anti-war activist and Indian nationalist

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Visiting a local conservatory can be a welcome and uplifting break from the days of winter that are cold and drab.  This was taken at the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory located in Como Park of Saint Paul, Minnesota.