Great Blue Heron

“A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.”

~John James Audubon (1785-1851), American scientist

(Quote Source: brainyquote.com)

blue-heron-flying-lake

A great blue heron flies gracefully across a Minnesota lake as the sun dips lower into the horizon.

Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge

“Whatever we are waiting for – peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance – it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart.”

~ Sarah Ban Breathnach (1947- ), American author

(Quote Source: brainyquote.com)

swan-wild-rice-refuge

A swan flies over the wild rice beds of the Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge located in McGregor, Minnesota.

To learn more about the refuge, please visit their website.

 

 

Learning

“Face it. We’re all ignorant. But there’s a big difference between not knowing anything about, say, astrophysics, and not knowing anything about the natural world we inhabit. The sad fact is, when it comes to nature, the average American is clueless about some very basic stuff.

For example, a recent poll taken at the National Zoo in Washington, DC, revealed that over 75% of their visitors did not know the purpose of pollination.”

~ Andy Wasowski, Native Gardens for Dry Climates

(Quote Source: October 24, 1997 interview as posted on loe.org.  See link at:  http://loe.org/shows/segments.html?programID=97-P13-00043&segmentID=6)

Honey-Bee-Sedum

(Honey bee on sedum plant)

I am grateful to people that blog.  I appreciate their courage and commitment to the sharing of ideas, experiences, creativity, research, and thoughts with the rest of the world.  I have learned so much in the last year.  Thank you!

 

Compassionate Viewpoint

“But, to love nature and to hate humanity is illogical. Humanity is part of the whole. To truly love the world is also to love human ingenuity and playfulness. Nature does not need to be cleansed of human artifacts to be beautiful or coherent. Yes, we should be less greedy, untidy, wasteful, and shortsighted. But let us not turn responsibility into self-hatred. Our biggest failing is, after all, lack of compassion for the world. Including ourselves.”

~ David George Haskell,  The Forest Unseen

(Quote Source: goodreads.com)

AS4A7354-1

I took this photo in 2014 of a ranch in Wyoming — a setting that seemed such a lovely representation of humans working with and for nature.

Please Don’t Pick the Trilliums

“God has sown his name on the heavens in glittering stars; but on earth he planteth His name by tender flowers.”

~ Jean Paul Richter, (1763-1825) German Romantic writer

IMG_9691-1

This lovely white flower with just three petals on a single stem is known as the Large-flowered Trillium (Trillium grandiflorum).  It can be found in the woodlands of Minnesota and I am lucky enough to have quite a few growing on my property.  Because picking even a part of the plant can kill the whole thing, trilliums are considered quite fragile.  In addition, this plant is slow to establish, taking years to flower.

Large-flowered trilliums are also sensitive to changes in their environment, so they can be good indicators of the health of a forest. Trillium populations have been on the decline, primarily because of soil disturbance, the loss of soil organic matter from non-native earthworms, buckthorn invasion, and overgrazing by deer.  Consequently, Minnesota and many other states have laws to restrict the collection of trilliums. In Minnesota it is illegal to remove trilliums from public land or another person’s property without the owner’s consent.

(Source: http://www.bwsr.state.mn.us/news/webnews/may2014/5.pdf)

eBird

“The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow.”

~ Bill Gates (1955- ) Co-founder of Microsoft

AS4A9706-1(Red-tailed hawk gliding over cornfields on a day in spring.)

As a nature-lover I am interested in supporting efforts that are beneficial to our natural world.  Recently I have spent some time acquainting myself with a site called eBird.   Sponsored by groups such as the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, eBird is a real-time, online checklist program that has revolutionized the way that the birding community reports and accesses information about birds.

By joining the site you can:

  • Record the birds you see
  • Keep track of your bird lists
  • Explore dynamic maps and graphs
  • Share your sightings and join the eBird community
  • Contribute to science and conservation

The use of this global tool is absolutely free.  I’m having fun with it and encourage others with an interest in birds to explore this site as well.